I'm a philosophy student that tends to post about really serious things unseriously and about really unserious things seriously.

I was once described as a "beautiful, intelligent iguana".

17th July 2012

Photo reblogged from isomorphismes with 61 notes

isomorphismes:

Yes! Video games are the best way to explain basic topology. 

You know those special levels in Super Mario Bros. where the screen doesn’t move with you — you’re just in a “room” and if you go off to the right you arrive back on the left?
That was just a convenience for the game programmers.
But think about this: what’s the difference between a straight line that meets back to its other end and you loop over and over and over the same spot while running forward — and a circle?
(Answer: there is no difference. If we wanted to imagine Mario being a 3-D person, we could — he’d be running around a cylinder (this room he’s jumping to get the coins in would just be maybe 2-3 shoulders wide and dug in a circle underneath the ground. Or the brick platform he’s running on equally wide and it’s built in a cylinder above off the ground. We just don’t see that he’s constantly adjusting to bear a few degrees left as he’s running.


How about Star Fox battle mode?
If you drive off the north of the screen you end up at the south, and if you fly off the east you end up on the west.
At first I thought this just meant we were flying around an entire planet Like The Little Prince’s moon or so. (The non-map visuals—the main flying visuals—could go along with this story, since there’s suelo below and cielo above.)
But on further consideration this can’t be the case. Think about a globe of the Earth: east and west are connected contiguously ::globe pic:: — but the North Pole is as far away from the South Pole as you can get. ::mathworld pic::
Think about running away from your enemy to the northeast corner and disappearing very quickly off the north to the south, then disappearing just as quickly from east to west. What allows you to do this quick of a dodge?
Think about if the North Pole anhttp://arxiv.org/pdf/1205.6044v1.pdfd the South Pole WERE equivalent. Picture the Earth and start “sucking the two towards each other”.
You would end up with….

isomorphismes:

Yes! Video games are the best way to explain basic topology

    • You know those special levels in Super Mario Bros. where the screen doesn’t move with you — you’re just in a “room” and if you go off to the right you arrive back on the left?
    • That was just a convenience for the game programmers.
    • But think about this: what’s the difference between a straight line that meets back to its other end and you loop over and over and over the same spot while running forward — and a circle?
    • (Answer: there is no difference. If we wanted to imagine Mario being a 3-D person, we could — he’d be running around a cylinder (this room he’s jumping to get the coins in would just be maybe 2-3 shoulders wide and dug in a circle underneath the ground. Or the brick platform he’s running on equally wide and it’s built in a cylinder above off the ground. We just don’t see that he’s constantly adjusting to bear a few degrees left as he’s running.
    • How about Star Fox battle mode?
    • If you drive off the north of the screen you end up at the south, and if you fly off the east you end up on the west.
    • At first I thought this just meant we were flying around an entire planet Like The Little Prince’s moon or so. (The non-map visuals—the main flying visuals—could go along with this story, since there’s suelo below and cielo above.)
    • But on further consideration this can’t be the case. Think about a globe of the Earth: east and west are connected contiguously ::globe pic:: — but the North Pole is as far away from the South Pole as you can get. ::mathworld pic::
    • Think about running away from your enemy to the northeast corner and disappearing very quickly off the north to the south, then disappearing just as quickly from east to west. What allows you to do this quick of a dodge?
    • Think about if the North Pole anhttp://arxiv.org/pdf/1205.6044v1.pdfd the South Pole WERE equivalent. Picture the Earth and start “sucking the two towards each other”.
    • You would end up with….

Tagged: topologytorusmathematicsStar FoxPac ManVideo GamesMario

Source: deifying

16th March 2012

Link reblogged from isomorphismes with 27 notes

Topology as a tool for Postmodern Philosophy →

isomorphismes:

The methods of topology, when applied to cultural analysis, provide a rigorous, yet unabashedly humble investigation of the nature of cultural relationships.

—Brent M. Blackwell

For later. Totally want to read.

Tagged: culturemathematicspostmodernismtopologyphilosophycultural analysispostmodernhumilityrigour